Who Gets to Fix the Faucet: Tenant or Landlord?

This can be as confusing as the Edward Nygma with the riddles, and if I were Batman, I’d get some ground rules down on what guidelines to follow in spite of the many situations you could be involved in with a landlord, property management company, or apartment complex. Get some rental tips together and make sure you’re prepared — because Batman’s always prepared.

How a Superhero Would Get a Faucet Fixedreal estate Batman

Basic rule of thumb: your landlord has one expectation to fulfill: a habitable environment for the tenant (in this case Batman, who has a bat cave with minimal plumbing, it seems). A habitable environment is defined specifically as a dwelling providing adequate heat, water and electricity. It has to be safe. So in the case of a leaky faucet, you then ask the ultimate question: will the tenant or landlord fix the problem? Good question….

Batman would just do it on his own, but here’s the thing: by law, landlords are required to repair or replace items that have been damaged through normal wear and tear. That simply means if the faucet started leaking over time, chances are the question of tenant or landlord is answered by the latter. If the tenant broke the faucet, however — tenant or landlord? You guessed it: tenant.

The Question of Tenant or Landlord Not Entirely Black or White

You can tell automatically that the question of tenant or landlord isn’t necessarily an easy question to answer, because any situation regardless of real estate trends for 2015 — debatable even in a court of law — can have differing viewpoints. Perspectives. Opinions. It can get pretty confusing.

This is why, in fact, it’s important that you have this all set up, written out, and agreed upon immediately even before you sign a lease. That way whenever anyone asks the question of tenant or landlord as far as repair and replacement are concerned, the answer’s pretty easy — as easy as Batman beating the pulp out of the Joker.

3 thoughts on “Who Gets to Fix the Faucet: Tenant or Landlord?

    • Hello, Darlene,

      Thanks for the interesting question. If we’re talking about a building with multiple units within, then it all depends on what’s written on the lease. A landlord can’t lease the entire property to anyone, but just singular units, precisely because there are already tenants with a lease agreement in just one apartment of the building. Now I believe if it’s written in the lease agreement with the appropriate stipulations, a single party can rent out multiple units (but not the one unit already occupied by said tenants).

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