Overdoing the Home Makeover: an Instant Killer to Selling the House

Don’t go DIY crazy just yet with your home, especially if you’re selling the house to a potential buyer in the long run. Why? Because that completely redone open floor plan might not translate well in terms of top dollar for your investment when buyers come in to make their offers. You actually might lose money. No home seller wants that.

However, don’t get me wrong on this topic at all, because as a home seller, when selling your house, you better have some improvements in place, just one tip out of a plethora of secrets to home selling. You just need the right ones for it to convert into some profit on your end. What are the right ones? Read on, friends….

When Gearing Up for Selling the House, Keep Your Renovations MinimalIndia

Quick fixes are the name of the game. Such touch-ups can include any of these:

  • Door Handle Replacements
  • Cabinet Hardware Refinishing
  • Fixing Leaky Faucets
  • Cleaning the Grout
  • Fresh Coats of Paint on the Walls
  • Cleaning the Curtains

Little things like that can really go a long way when selling the house. Even making sure your closet doors are on the tracks, so buyers can open them, will ultimately contribute to whatever offer buyers might provide. Every little bit helps.

I’ll say this much, though…. If your roof’s leaking really badly because a tree went through it, definitely shell out the money to get that fixed! Those issues are necessities. But to really spruce up the place with major updates, such as what house flippers might do? Not so necessary….

Being Thrifty Is Smart

Now if you want to renovate major areas of your future home…. That’s where, indeed, H.O.P.E. to Own can come in and assist you. Contact our specialists today about your zero-down home and get renovating!

Outgrowing Your Home With No Chance for Renovation: What Can You Do?

For those families or individuals considering a move “up” in the real estate market, there’s the other option: renovation. It’s convenient, it’s creative, it offers options, and you develop a sense of accomplishment as you make a house into a home. Your home. However, sometimes situations can prevent you from ever doing anything even close to a lick of a paint can and roller on just one wall in your living room.

Why You Might Just Have to Consider a Move to a New Homerenovation real estate

Your rent-to-own home through the H.O.P.E. Program might have the option; make no mistake about that (because your landlord’s laid back, of course). Here’s the thing, though: perhaps your local ordinance won’t allow a renovation, adding new square footage. If that’s the case, what other option do you have?

Your other issue just might be all about the hassle. Think of the plastic wrap, dust, paint cans, ladders, and other non-specific “hazards” associated with a renovation, and if you’re the certain type of homeowner who doesn’t want to deal with all that — as well as shell out the costs from your valuable home equity loan — might want to consider a major move into a larger dwelling.

There’s the issue, too, of over-improving for your area. In the long run, if you’re maximizing sweat equity for your home, adding too much might be a disadvantage to you. Look at the comparables, for one thing — look around your neighborhood. You just might find that a renovation might put your home above the market, hence whenever the time’s right for you to sell and make some profit from all your investment, you could stand the chance of your home sitting there collecting dust while buyers pass you by. Might not be something you want to face!

A Renovation Might Not Be the Best Course of Action, But….

Every homeowner’s situation is different. You might be happy with your tiny Maine house. Who knows. That renovation might be the best idea, as long as your ordinance allows it. If not, though, pack up your stuff!

Why You Should Ask Questions Before Painting Your Rent-to-Own Home

This rule you’ll read about out of all the rental tips you’ll pick up does happen to be very particular. By particular, I mean involving a landlord who will immediately throw a temper tantrum over the fact that you, the tenant, thought it would be a good idea to have your daughter paint a flower on the beautiful white drywall! Be careful here. Even if you’re in a rent-to-own home from the H.O.P.E. Program, you’re limited on what you can do as far as renovations and improvements are concerned (at least until you sign off on a lease and own the home with a mortgage).

Think About It: You Don’t Actually Own That Rent-to-Own Home (Yet)real estate paint

Therefore, by law, you can’t make any improvements on your rent-to-own home. No painting. No additions. No installed shelving. In many cases, you may not even be able to purchase pets, or even fish. Who knows. In general, if the landlord’s in charge of repairs of everything from the furnace to the gutters on the roof, legally and fairly, you must not change anything as far as the structure and makeup of the dwelling.

Let’s back up, though, for a moment…. Remember: your landlord’s not a mindless terminator out to get your money. Rather, chances are you might even see that your rent-to-own home lease agreement doesn’t even say anything about improvements at all, meaning legally — since it’s not in the writing — you can probably paint a room or two.

Here’s the basic rule of thumb, though: ask. Always bring it up with your landlord first. Get the approval in writing — as a real estate attorney would, yet again, advise — and you’ve definitively covered all your bases.

You Live in It, Not Own It

That’s the basic truth about renting, rent-to-own homes, and tenancy. It’s a trade-off. Just know, though, that you might get lucky: you might get a landlord who’ll let you paint the living room hot pink! You won’t know unless you ask, and that’s why this is quite the premier tip as far as rental homes are concerned.