Playing it Safe With Credit Cards: Pull Lever Only During Emergencies

Whether it’s a lever or a button, if it’s red, you know you could end up dead. Unless it’s an emergency, and you absolutely have to press that button! It’s a last resort. No turning back. Do or die! Exciting, isn’t it?

Well, That’s Actually How Credit Cards Are, Too

They’re like emergency buttons. Or at least that’s how they’re supposed to be. We can read about all the must-do’s and should-have’s when it comes to credit cards, but here’s the thing — the single most important motto you must take with you is this: credit cards must be used only as a last resort.
Against all better judgment, use your credit card as a last resort. If there’s an asteroid coming at you, and you’ve exhausted all measures to try and thwart the big, dumb rock, use your credit card as a last resort. If you have no money, no car, no clothes, no pizza, and no way back home from the Mojave Desert, and all you have on you is a credit card — then, and only then, you must use it as a last resort.

That’s How Credit Cards Were Meant to Be Used

When you think about it, it makes sense. This goes with all sorts of education under your belt, particularly when it benefits your credit repair regimen with Lexington Law. Of course, the experts there will tell you the same thing: prevent the future from collapsing on you and focus on emergencies only when using your credit card.
That means if you can eat it, drink it or use it for your own benefit somehow, better hold off on pulling the plastic and wait until you have some good ol’ fashioned, cold, hard cash. You save yourself some trouble.
That means if your car breaks down, and you don’t have enough cash immediately on you, go ahead and pull the Visa out. If a hurricane hits your home and pulls the roof off and you have to pay off a deductible, I would think it’s okay to get the Mastercard out. You see what I’m saying?

It’s a Minor, Yet Still Extremely Important Measure, to Take When It Comes to a Credit Card

Because you do have to remember one thing: when you contact the H.O.P.E. Program to consider owning your own zero-down home, know that your credit score will matter tremendously. You can’t have a good score, though, without actually using the credit card (or other lines of credit, whatever they may be).

So practice this, above all else: responsibility. And don’t press that emergency button unless it’s absolutely necessary.

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